Experts Issue Reminders for Safe Food Consumption Practices in Warmer Weather

Food safety officials wish to reminding people of the importance of safe food preparation, transportation, and consumption practices.
November 27, 2012

With the warmer months officially coming up for Australian citizens, food safety officials are bent on reminding people of the importance of safe food preparation, transportation, and consumption practices.

Failing to adhere to current health standards can lead to infections from bacteria such as salmonella and listeria, so it’s important that great care be taken to be healthful and wise.

Warnings to Observe When Eating Out of Doors

Once the mercury rises, bacteria can grow on food far more easily when it’s unwisely stored at temperatures that fall within the 5-60 degree Celsius range. Food and consumables can also easily be exposed to additional contaminants from dirt and warm weather pests such as insects.

Foods That Represent Higher Risk

Not all foods are created equally when it comes to growing dangerous bacteria that can make you sick. Some are definitely higher risk than others. These include meats and poultry products. Eggs, dairy products, and seafood can also be problematic. Even some items that you normally wouldn’t think would be high risk fall into this category including starchy foods like pasta and rice or prepared salads such as coleslaw and pasta salad.

Some Individuals Are at Higher Risk for Infection, Too

Not only are some foods more likely to be related to food poisoning, but some types of people are at much higher risk than others. These individuals include the elderly, very young children (five years of age or younger), pregnant women, and people with chronic diseases that might be suffering from compromised immune systems.

Proper Preventative Measures

Raw meat should always be stored away from other foods. It’s also important to travel with a cooler to avoid food becoming elevated in temperature. Last but not least, make sure all food is prepped ahead of time to reduce the likelihood of additional contamination.