Frequently Asked Questions

Get answers to your questions with the Australian Institute of Food Safety's Frequently Asked Questions section.

AIFS Courses


A Food Safety Supervisor course is quite different to a food handling course.

A food handling course, such as AIFS Food Handlers’ Course, is designed to give a basic to intermediate level of competency in food safety. This qualification prepares you to work in a commercial kitchen.

Food Safety Supervisor course is the highest tier of training we offer at the Australian Institute of Food Safety. It is designed to meet the legal requirements for a Food Safety Supervisor set by the Australian Government.

This nationally-accredited course qualifies you to:

  • Oversee a Food Safety Program
  • Build a Food Safety Planing alignment with Australian law, with customised solutions for your business
  • Direct and train staff in food safety
  • Prepare the business for a food safety emergency
  • Supervise all aspects of food safety in a business at a managerial level.

Most Australian food businesses must employ at least one person qualified as a Food Safety Supervisor to meet legal requirements in Australia. Please read the Food Safety Programs: An Overview to check whether your food business falls into this category.


Depending on the course chosen, most students take between 3 and 8 hours to complete their online study. This includes the lessons, case studies and assessments. 

However, these time estimates don’t include on-site activities and practical work that you’ll need to complete as part of the observer report. The time it takes to do this section varies, and depends on your current situation.

Also, don’t forget that you don’t have to do the course all in one go. You can do as little or as much as you’d like in any one session. The course will remember where you were up to, so when you log back in, you can just pick up where you left off!

As for how long you have to complete your course, it’s valid for one year from the date you enrolled.


Online courses are a flexible, convenient and affordable option for those completing food safety training.

Online training often provides a more accessible, more convenient and more affordable option for those wishing to study. When it comes to food safety training, learning the right way to implement food safety procedures is a must for any Food Handler. However it’s not always easy to find the time to attend a classroom course - that’s even if you can find one in your area.

Not only do our online courses teach students the fundamental food safety knowledge and skills they need to safely and effectively perform their duties, they also meet all legislative requirements regarding food safety.

When it comes to food safety training, the Australian Institute of Food Safety’s online courses are second to none. They can be accessed 24-7, are easy to navigate, have no hidden fees, and cover all your legislative needs. What’s more, we have food safety experts that provide exceptional student support via email and over the phone, so you can speak directly to us if you need help.


Training in Australia is highly regulated to ensure quality and consistency of training courses. Nationally recognised training means that the course is recognised by relevant industry groups and governing bodies nation wide.

Most of our courses at the Australian Institute of Food Safety are nationally recognised. You can tell which ones are nationally recognised because they display the triangular ‘nationally recognised training’ logo on the course page.

This means that the course is delivered in accordance with a nationally recognised training package, and your statement of attainment will be recognised throughout Australia. You can even choose to use the units of competency attained through this training towards a further qualification, such as a qualification in Hospitality.

NSW Food Safety Supervisors

Although the statements of attainment that we issue are nationally recognised, if you live in NSW and want to work as a Food Safety Supervisor, you’ll also need to hold a special green NSW Certificate. This is a NSW Food Authority requirement and is issued to students who complete our NSW Food Safety Supervisor course.

If you’d like to learn more about nationally recognised training, please contact our support team.


At the Australian Institute of Food Safety, we offer a variety of food safety courses for you to choose from. But, how do you decide which one is right for you? Finding out which course you need to do will depend on your situation.

Our students complete courses with us for lots of different reasons. They might be applying for a job that requires a Food Handler Certificate, or setting up a food van and need a Food Safety Supervisor certificate, or just want to learn some of the basics. Whatever the reason, our nationally recognised courses meet all legislative requirements across Australia and will give you the food safety knowledge you need.

Online food safety courses

At an introductory level, we have a non-accredited course called Introduction to Food Safety, which teaches students basic food safety skills. After this course is completed, students receive a certificate of completion.

We also have a nationally recognised Food Handler course. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required to work as a Food Handler. Once they’ve finished, the students receive a nationally recognised statement of attainment for the unit of competency SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety. This is more commonly known as a ‘Food Handling certificate’.

We also offer the official AIFS Food Safety Supervisor course. This is our most popular course, and not only teaches students all of the necessary skills for safe food handling but also how to monitor and maintain food safety in a business, including a Food Safety Program.

If you have already completed the Food Handler course, then you can become a Food Safety Supervisor by taking our Advanced Food Safety course (not applicable to students in New South Wales).

For more information on which course you should complete, you can either visit the individual course pages on our website or contact our support team


This depends on what you want to get out of your training.

If you want to learn how to prepare, handle and serve food safely, but not how to supervise a business in food safety, then you would choose a Food Handler course.

However if you wish to be employed as a business’s Food Safety Supervisor, you will need to complete a nationally recognised course which teaches you not just the safest ways to handle and prepare food, but also how to properly monitor and maintain safe food practices in a food business.

Also, even though a Food Safety Supervisor course is more extensive than a Food Handler course, because having a Food Safety Supervisor is usually required in order for a food business to be granted a food business licence, it’s often worth still completing the full Food Safety Supervisor course.


Yes, you can. An online Food Safety Supervisor course provides students with flexible learning options that let them complete the units at their own pace. This means it can be tailor-made to a person’s individual needs.

Because students don’t have to attend physical classes, they can study wherever and whenever it suits them. Considering how busy everyday life continues to become, this is often the deciding factor for students who are looking to complete a Food Safety Supervisor course.

You can do the Australian Institute of Food Safety’s online Food Safety Supervisor course in under a day. Or, because the system automatically saves your progress, you can log in and out as many times as you like for a year following enrollment.  

For more information on the online Food Safety Supervisor course, or to enrol now, you can visit our course page. 


A Food Handler course teaches the fundamental skills needed to perform the role of a food handler in the Australian food industry.

It teaches students how to recognise, control and prevent potential food safety hazards from occurring, so as to minimise the risk of individuals becoming sick. The course also includes lessons on the best and safest ways of handling food; maintaining good personal hygiene; and the responsibilities of all food handlers.

This course is suitable for workers who handle food as a part of their position but will not be monitoring the overall state of food safety for an entire business.

The official Australian Institute of Food Safety Food Handler course can be completed online in a matter of hours and is a great qualification for any food handler working in Australia’s busy food handling environment.


Even though there are many similarities between the two, Food Safety Supervisor and Food Handler are two different positions. There are different training courses for each and different levels of responsibility in the workplace.

A Food Handler is just that, someone who handles food as part of their position. Whereas a Food Safety Supervisor is someone that handles food, supervises food handling staff, maintains the Food Safety Program, and makes sure a food business uses best food safety practices.

When it comes to training, a Food Handler course is not as involved or extensive as a Food Safety Supervisor course. Food Safety Supervisors not only learn all of the information in a Food Handler course, they also learn the skills and knowledge that go along with being able to supervise food safety in a business. While Food Handlers have to know how to update the Food Safety Plan of a business, it’s the Food Safety Supervisor who is responsible for its overall maintenance.

How do you know which course is right for you?

Food safety is an important consideration for all food businesses. Protecting your business from contamination and reducing the risk of food poisoning are top priorities on the list of reasons why you might decide to take a food safety course, or request your staff members to take one. However, selecting the course that is right for you can be difficult.

If you have to do a food safety course but you’re not sure which one is right for you, check out this handy guide.


Although there is currently no law that states a specific training course that Food Handlers need to complete, many will choose to complete a Food Handler course.

All Food Handlers in Australia need to have current food safety knowledge, so they can ensure all food which is prepared and served is safe for people to eat. Food safety training teaches you the safest way to handle, prepare and serve food.

Also, because food businesses are responsible for making sure that their Food Handling staff are properly trained in food safety, they often include this certificate as a job requirement. This is because a Food Handler course is a great way of ensuring that all Food Handlers in a food business have received the appropriate food safety training.

What is a Food Handler?

A Food Handler is anyone who handles food as part of his or her position. This can include, chefs, cooks, supermarket workers, baristas, food processing workers, food delivery drivers, childcare workers and typically anyone else who touches food at work or while volunteering.

Assessments


Your observer report must be completed by someone currently employed in the food industry.

Your observer report can be completed by:

  • Someone in the industry that you are currently working with, or
  • Someone in the industry that you have previously worked with (within the last 12 months), or
  • Someone in the industry you have volunteered with.

The really important thing is that the person writing in the examples and signing off your observer report has seen you do everything listed on the report more than once.

If you’re not working at the moment, then don’t worry. We often have students in the same situation. A good solution would be to volunteer for a few shifts with a charity, community organisation or other food business. Many places are happy to have volunteers help out in return for completing the observer report. If you’re looking for charities near you, a great place to find out more information is your local council.

If you need some help finding someone who can complete your observer report, please feel free to contact us and we can help explore some options in your local area.


National recognition is offered to course participants who have already completed one or more of the required units of competency through previous formal education or training. Participants who wish to apply for national recognition will be required to submit a copy of their statement of attainment or qualification. This will then be verified by our training and assessment team with the issuing RTO before credit transfer is awarded.

The following guidelines also apply:

  • Any student is entitled to apply for national recognition in a course or qualification in which they are currently enrolled.
  • Students may not apply for national recognition for units of competency or qualifications which are not included in our scope of registration.
  • Whilst students may apply for national recognition at any time, they are encouraged to apply before commencing a training program. This will reduce unnecessary training and guide the student down a more efficient path to competence.
  • The student does not incur any fees for national recognition and we do not receive any funding when national recognition is granted.
  • National recognition may only be awarded for whole units of competency.
  • National recognition will only be issued when the student’s enrolment includes at least one other unit of competency for which the student is participating in training or is seeking recognition.
  • The recognition of a unit of competency under a national recognition arrangement is not contingent on the applicant demonstrating their currency.
  • If the unit has been previously awarded and equivalence can be demonstrated then the unit can be recognised. The currency of the applicant is not a factor to be considered.

To learn more about national recognition, or to find out how to apply, please contact us for more information.


Recognition of prior learning is offered to course participants who believe that they already meet the skills and knowledge requirements of the course through previous work experience and formal, non-formal and informal learning.

To assess whether a course participant has enough experience, we ask that applicants complete the online quiz components of their chosen course and that they provide documentary evidence to demonstrate when and where the required skills were performed. We provide a recognition of prior learning form to participants to help in gathering this evidence.

To learn more about recognition of prior learning, or to find out how to apply, please contact our support team for more information.


You must score 100% in each of the quizzes to move onto the next one, and you have 5 attempts for each quiz to do this. If you’ve used up your 5 attempts – no problem! Please contact us by email or on 1300 797 020 and we’ll reset them for you.

Don’t worry – you haven’t failed the course if this happens…and we definitely won’t charge you any additional fees!


Observer reports are an important part of the assessment process because they show us that you can apply the food safety knowledge that you have learned in your course in a practical situation. By demonstrating food safety skills in a work environment, you can perform the required tasks without having to come to a classroom and show us.

There are two options for completing the report:

  1. Simply send the form to your nominated observer using the form on the course page
  2. Download and print the form and ask someone in your workplace (past or present) to complete.
    Once complete, scan or take photos of the form and attach it as part of your Final Submission at the end of the course

Once you've completed all of the online components on the course page and we've received your completed Observer Report, we can begin processing your assessment and issue you with a Statement of Attainment.

Please note that it’s a legal requirement that you are able to demonstrate the tasks listed on the observer report and we do check that every one we receive is authentic.


The person that acts as your nominated observer does not need to be a Food Safety Supervisor. They need to be employed either on a full time, part time or volunteer basis in a position where they handle food. They must also have current knowledge and skills in food safety.

Your observer should work in the same industry as you, preferably as a supervisor or team leader, and has to have observed you complete the tasks listed in the Observer Report over a period of time.


The assessment components of each course are different depending on which one you’re compleating. 

The course material is presented in short, interactive video lessons that each have a multiple choice quiz. The case studies and reading activities are short pieces of text that you read, and also have a multiple choice quiz.

You also need to have an Observer Report completed by someone that you've worked with within the last 12 months. The Observer Report is a form that lists the food safety skills you learned in your course. It has to be filled out by your observer, usually your supervisor or team leader.

Once you've finished the online components of the course and we've received your completed Observer Report, we can start processing your assessment and send you your Statement of Attainment.

Food Safety Supervisor

  • 7 x Quizzes
  • 2 x Case Studies
  • 3 x Reading Activities / Case Studies (NSW only)
  • Observer Report (Online or Print)

Food Handler Course 

  • 4 x Quizzes
  • 1 x Case Study
  • 1 x Reading Activity
  • Observer Report (Online or Print)

Introduction to Food Safety

  • 4 x Quizzes

When we’ve assessed you as competent, we’ll send you an email to let you know that you’ve passed, as well as an email copy of your Statement of Attainment, and NSW certificate if applicable. This will usually happen on the same business day that you complete your course.

You’ll then receive your graduation pack including your printed Statement of Attainment, and NSW Food Safety Supervisor certificate if applicable, in the post within 3 to 7 business days.


This depends on which units of competency you need to have on your statement of attainment. Because Food Safety Supervisor requirements in Australia are industry-specific, you need to choose the observer report that matches your industry.

We’ve listed the units of competency for each food sector below, as well as some examples of businesses that fall under them. However, please note that only the retail and hospitality food industry sectors are recognised in NSW.

Retail 

Unit: SIRRFSA001 Apply retail food safety practices

Examples: Businesses such as supermarkets, convenience stores, grocers, delicatessens, and retail markets and stalls. Take-away and fast food businesses can be considered either retail or hospitality

Hospitality

Units: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

Examples: Businesses such as restaurants, cafes, pubs and hotels.

Health and Community

Units: HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practice & HLTFSE007 Oversee the day-to-day implementation of food safety in the workplace & HLTFSE005 Apply and monitor food safety requirements

Examples: Food organisations such as hospitals, childcare centres, nursing homes, hostels, and Meals on Wheels services.

Food Processing

Units: FBPFSY1001 Follow work procedures to maintain food safety & FDFFS2001A Implement the food safety program and procedures

Examples: Businesses such as food product manufacturers, including flour mills, canneries, packers, wholesale bakeries, breweries, manufacturers of pre-prepared meals, and wineries.

Transport and Distribution

Units: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

Examples: Businesses such as warehouses, bulk food distributors, and water carriers.


The observer report is the practical component of the course. There are some things we can't see you doing through your computer - such as washing your hands or wearing the correct clothes for work. 

In order to comply with the government requirements for Food Safety Supervisor training, you do need to demonstrate that you can perform such tasks correctly.

To make this as easy as possible for you, we allow you to be observed by a co-worker or supervisor.

There are two options for completing the report:

  1. Simply send the form to your nominated observer using the form on the course page
  2. Download and print the form and ask someone in your workplace (past or present) to complete. 
    Once complete, scan or take photos of the form and attach it as part of your Final Submission at the end of the course

Don't worry if you're not working in the food industry, our food safety courses can be completed by anyone regardless of prior experience. 

What about my observer report?

We understand it can be difficult when you're new to the industry to have the observer report filled out, so there are several options you have:

1. If you have worked in the food industry in the past, then you can have a past manager or co-worker fill it out. Your observer does not need to be a chef or a trained food safety supervisor. It can be anyone currently employed in the food industry with a minimum of 12 months experience.

2. If you have a friend or family member employed in the food industry, they can also observe you. Again, it doesn't need to be a qualified chef or food safety supervisor, your observer could even be someone who has worked at a fast-food restaurant, or in a school tuck-shop, or volunteered at homeless kitchens or church groups etc. 

3. If you do have a friend or a family member with industry experience that can observe you, you can perform these tasks in a simulated work environment such as your home kitchen. 

4. You can also contact your local council and ask for a list of food-based charities that you can volunteer for. Many of these organisations deal with food and any regular volunteer is able to act as your observer. 

The really important thing is that the person completing your Observer Report has seen you do everything listed on the report more than once.


To complete the course, students are required to demonstrate specific tasks in front of an observer in a workplace or simulated environment.

As it’s not possible for our assessors to directly observe the student at work, we need industry experts to observe the student and provide feedback on their performance.

Who Fills Out The Report

To fill out the Observer Report, you must meet minimum requirements. These include:

  • You must have a minimum of 12 months food industry experience or part-time equivalent

  • You must currently be in a role related to food handling

How The Report Gets Filled In

Simply follow the instructions provided on the Observer Report.

Some specific guidelines on completing the Observer Report that will enable us to process the student’s assessment more efficiently include:

  • It's mandatory to complete all sections of the Observer Report. We need to collect the exact number of examples requested to meet the legal and compliance requirements of the course. If any examples are left blank, it may delay the assessment process for the student. If any examples did not occur during the observation period, you might request the student to carry out the task/s in a simulated environment in your presence. The actions taken by the student can then be updated in the Observer Report.

  • In some sections, you are required to ‘select one’ example. Please ensure you select the most relevant, suitable and current example observed. This allows us to form a picture of the situation you observed.

  • When asked to ‘select all that apply’, select the best examples that you have observed. You are not required or expected to select all examples.

  • The Observer Report must be filled out by observing the student demonstrating the tasks multiple times over a period. This requirement should be indicated by ticking the box next to the statement ‘I have seen the student perform the tasks multiple times and to the expected industry standards’.

  • During your observation, the student is required to demonstrate the range of tasks to industry standards. This means that the level of skill demonstrated would be acceptable in a work environment. If you notice that any of the tasks were not carried out to a satisfactory standard, you may ask the student to redo the task.

  • During the observation period, the student must have access to the listed physical resources to demonstrate specific tasks. This must be indicated by completing the ‘Physical resources’ section.

  • When finished, you need to complete the ‘Observer Declaration’ section. Please ensure that this section is completed.

Including Comments

We recommend that you include comments on the performance of the student in the space provided at the end of each item in the Observer Report.

This will provide us with additional detail on what you observed, thereby reducing the need to contact you for further information. This will speed up the assessment process for the student.

The Observer’s Role in the Assessment Process

As an observer, you’re not required to assess the student. Rather your observations as an industry expert provide us with important evidence to be reviewed by our assessment team. This will help them to determine the competence of the student.

How to Complete Observation Start and End Dates

The Observer Report must be based on observations completed within the last 12 months.

It’s important to fill in the observation start and end date in the section ‘Observation Environment and Period’. This will indicate that the student has current knowledge and skills that you have observed.

The observation start and end dates should reflect the time frame over which you had observed the student, not just when the Observer Report was completed. If you’ve worked with the student for a period, then the start date should be when you commenced work with the student and therefore were in a position to observe them at work. The end date can be the final date you observed the student and completed the form.


In certain situations, students may be unable to find a suitable observer to complete their observer report. If you're in such a situation, you can send video evidence of yourself demonstrating the tasks in the observer report for assessment.

If you need to make a video recording, please follow the guidelines below:

  1. Download the observer report for the relevant industry
  2. Carefully review the tasks to be demonstrated
  3. Decide how you will demonstrate each task
  4. Record a video for each task, ensuring that your face is clear and you can be clearly heard explaining any steps as necessary
  5. Name each video to match the task that you are demonstrating. For example, a video demonstrating 'Task 1 Safe Food Handling' should be titled ‘Task 1’ or ‘Safe Food Handling’.
  6. Update the observer report to tell us which video to watch for each task
  7. Send both the observer report and completed videos to the assessment team

Important: If the observer report requires you to demonstrate a task more than once, you must ensure you record the required number of different examples.

Some tasks may be difficult to demonstrate, such as reporting food or hygiene hazards or reporting personal health issues. In such cases, you may simulate the situation and talk through the process that you would follow. For example, if you're demonstrating reporting personal health issues you can demonstrate feeling ill and contacting work to report your illness and any further steps you may need to take.

Business Accounts


At the Australian Institute of Food Safety, we’ve made things much easier for businesses who need to enrol multiple students.

Business accounts can be created for approved applicants, and make it easier to manage their food safety training requirements.

We have built some great features for these accounts including:

  • Bulk student enrolments 
  • Customised reporting
  • Priority support
  • 7 or 30-day invoicing arrangements

You can visit our Business page for more information or contact one of our friendly support team. We’ll be happy to help!


For businesses that need to enrol students regularly, we do offer 7 or 30-day invoicing terms, subject to approval.

If you would like to find out more, please contact one of our friendly support team. We'll be happy to help!

Food Safety Supervisor Info


All food businesses in certain states and territories of Australia (NSW, QLD, VIC, ACT) must have a Food Safety Supervisor if they serve:

  • Ready-to-eat food,
  • Potentially hazardous food, or
  • Food not sold and served in its package.

Food Safety Supervisors contribute to a food business in many ways. They can:

Play a Pivotal Role in a Food Business

Food safety is the foundation of a successful food business. A Food Safety Supervisor’s purpose is to optimise food safety in a business, building it into work practices to improve efficiency and prevent cases of food-borne illness in customers.

In 2006, OzFoodNet estimated that 5.4 million cases of food-borne illnesses occur each year in Australia, costing an estimated $1.2 billion per annum.

To reduce food-borne illness in the community, state law in NSW, QLD, VIC and ACT decrees that most food businesses must have a trained Food Safety Supervisor with their staff at all times. Businesses who do not comply with this law risk a fine.

As Australia has some of the most stringent food safety laws in the world, employing someone who can decode and apply these laws practically to your business is vital.

Use Skills and Training to Protect and Improve a Food Business

To become a Food Safety Supervisor in Australia, you must undertake a Food Safety Supervisor course.

Once you have completed the course, you will become fully qualified as a Food Safety Supervisor. You will receive a nationally recognised Statement of Attainment demonstrating your knowledge and expertise.

Food Safety Supervisors can use the knowledge from this course to:

  • Protect customers from food-borne illnesses
  • Manage physical, chemical and biological hazards in the workplace to protect workers
  • Train and supervise staff in the safe preparation of food
  • Devise a Food Safety Program to improve workplace efficiency
  • Build a Food Safety Plan in alignment with Australian law, tailored for the business
  • Ensure that all deliveries from suppliers are safe and stored correctly
  • Serve as a point of contact for local government
  • Prepare the business for the event of a food safety emergency

Incorporating food safety management into your everyday business will improve productivity, increase efficiency, and reduce waste.

Most importantly, having an employee trained as a Food Safety Supervisor will provide assurance of your business’ quality to customers.


Once you have successfully completed your Food Safety Supervisor course, you will receive a Statement of Attainment which lists the units of competency relevant to your industry. These are:

RETAIL

SIRRFSA001 Apply Retail Food Safety Practices

HOSPITALITY

SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety

SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

TRANSPORT & DISTRIBUTION

SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety

SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

HEALTH & COMMUNITY

HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practices

HLTFSE005 Apply and monitor food safety requirements

HLTFSE007 Oversee the day-to-day implementation of food safety in the workplace

FOOD PROCESSING

FBPFSY1001 Follow work procedures to maintain food safety

FDFFS2001A Implement the food safety program and procedures

If you have completed the New South Wales Food Safety Supervisor course, you will also receive a NSW Food Authority Food Safety Supervisor certificate, also known as the ‘green FSS certificate’. 

Your Statement of Attainment and the NSW Certificate for those students in the NSW course will be emailed out to you within two business days of you being marked as competent. We also post the hard copies of these certificates to you, along with a printed display certificate that lists the name of the course that you completed.


Not necessarily. If you’re required by law to have a Food Safety Supervisor on staff, it usually only means one per premises.

But, because you still need to make sure your business is covered and has a qualified Food Safety Supervisor who is reasonably available, an ideal option would be to hire more than one.

The ‘reasonably available’ requirement says that while the Food Safety Supervisor doesn’t have to be on the premises for every hour that the business if open, they have to be available to be contacted by both the business’s staff, at its food safety authority.

So, if your business has long operating hours or your Food Safety Supervisor is sick or goes on holidays, having another staff member who is also qualified can help meet this requirement.


Because food businesses in Melbourne are all so different, there isn’t one set of rules for everyone. However, most food businesses will require at least one Food Safety Supervisor to be employed.

Local councils judge the Food Safety Supervisor requirements of each food business on a case-by-case basis. The main factors they look at are – the types of high-risk foods being prepared and the chance of the business’s food making someone sick.

If foods are considered high-risk, it means they have a higher chance of rapid bacteria growth. Some examples of high-risk foods include meat, dairy products, seafood and poultry. So, if you use these types of foods in your business, then you will most likely have to nominate a Food Safety Supervisor.

If your food business does need a Food Safety Supervisor before you complete your training, it’s a good idea to contact your local food authority - usually your local council - and check which food industry your business falls under. This lets you know which industry your Food Safety Supervisor training needs to cover, and ensures that you complete the right course.


No, not necessarily – however, they must be able to be contacted at all times, by both the food handlers in the business and also the authority responsible for regulating the business in food safety.

Because food businesses can be open long hours and your Food Safety Supervisor might be sick or away on holidays, to help make sure that your business is better covered, it’s a good idea to have more than one Food Safety Supervisor.

It’s also important to note that a Food Safety Supervisor can generally only work for one business, in one location, at any time. So, if you own a franchise store or something similar, you will still have to nominate your own Food Safety Supervisor.


The role of a Food Safety Supervisor is to manage the overall food safety of a business. This typically includes:

  • Being aware of all relevant food safety legislation and standards that are applicable to the food business.
  • Monitoring all food handlers to make sure that all food handling tasks are properly and safely carried out.
  • Knowing how to recognise, prevent and alleviate food safety hazards in the food business.
  • Ensuring that food handlers maintain safe personal hygiene.
  • Ensuring that a business’s food safety program is up-to-date and accurately maintained.
  • Completing all required training and holding the necessary statement of attainment or certificate
  • Being ‘reasonably available’ to the business’s food handlers and its local council during operating hours.

The role of a Food Safety Supervisor in Brisbane is to maintain food safety in a business and minimise the chance of people becoming sick as a result of incorrectly handled or prepared food.

Food Safety Supervisors achieve this by ensuring that all food handlers receive the proper training, so that food handling tasks are correctly carried out. The role of a Food Safety Supervisor in Brisbane is also to monitor the food handlers themselves and to ensure they maintain a high level of personal hygiene.

According to the Queensland Department of Health, the Food Safety Supervisor of a food business is a person who:

  • Knows how to recognise, prevent and alleviate food safety hazards in the food business.
  • Has skills and knowledge in matters relating to food safety relevant to the food business.
  • Has the authority to supervise and give directions about matters relating to food safety to persons who handle food in the food business.
  • Is ‘reasonably available’ to be contacted by the local government that issued the licence and persons who handle food in the food business while the food business is being carried on.

The Food Safety Supervisor also has to maintain the business’s Food Safety Program. This is a live document, which always has to be kept up-to-date. It typically includes food safety records such as – temperature logs, cleaning schedules, pest control logs and any other relevant food safety documents.

The reasonably available requirement

Because a Food Safety Supervisor can’t be expected to always be on the premises, the requirement is that they’re ‘reasonably available’. This means that if they’re not on the premises, they still have to be contactable by all food handlers in the business, as well as its local council.

Also, please note though that although the Food Safety Supervisor is responsible for the overall food safety of a business, they’re not responsible for performing ALL food safety tasks in the business. Maintaining food safety in a business is the responsibility of all staff.


Handy tip: Food Safety Supervisor training is industry specific so be sure to find out which course you need.

To perform the role of a Food Safety Supervisor, you’ll most likely have to complete a nationally recognised training course. Food Safety Supervisor training is different for each of the food industry sectors - hospitality, food processing, health and community and retail. So, before choosing a course, it's important to find out which industry your business falls under.

Food Safety Supervisor training teaches you the advanced skills needed to:

  • Oversee the food safety of a business
  • Protect customers from foodborne illnesses
  • Design and maintain a Food Safety Program
  • Manage physical, chemical and biological hazards in the workplace
  • Train employees in food safety
  • Ensure transparency and safety in the food supply chain - for example, checking that all deliveries from suppliers are safe and stored correctly
  • Serve as a point of contact for local government
  • Prepare the business for the event of a food safety emergency, such as a food poisoning incident

Once the appropriate training has been completed you will receive a Statement of Attainment which outlines the units of competency you have achieved.


The Australian Institute of Food Safety is approved to issue the NSW Food Authority Food Safety Supervisor Certificate.

To be qualified as a Food Safety Supervisor in NSW, you will need to complete approved training in the relevant units of competency and hold a current NSW Food Authority Food Safety Supervisor Certificate.

The Food Safety Supervisor must complete either the two hospitality units of competency or the one retail unit of competency, which are listed below:

Retail: SIRRFSA001 Apply Retail Food Safety Practices

Hospitality: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety (previously SITXFSA101 Use hygienic practices for food safety) & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices (previously SITXFSA201 Participate in safe food handling practices)

The NSW Food Authority will only recognise training if it’s delivered by an approved Registered Training Organisation (RTO), like the Australian Institute of Food Safety.


As a general rule, only one Food Safety Supervisor is needed for each food premises. However, because food businesses often operate long hours or shift work, they’re often advised to employ more than one.

A key legal requirement of a Food Safety Supervisor is that they’re reasonably available at all times. This is to make sure that they’re able to:

  • Dispense food safety advice
  • Monitor and prevent hazards in the workplace
  • Supervise food handling staff, and
  • Deal with food safety emergencies and unexpected health inspections

Although this doesn’t mean that the Food Safety Supervisor needs to be on the business premises 24/7, they should be contactable during all hours of business operation.

For more information on the number of Food Safety Supervisors, your business will need, please visit our dedicated article


You may have already completed the Food Safety Supervisor units of competency in previous training.

This will depend on a few things. If you live in Queensland, Victoria, NSW or the ACT, and have been told that you need to provide your local council with proof of your Food Safety Supervisor qualification, this needs to be either a Statement of Attainment with the correct units of competency on it, or a NSW Food Safety Supervisor Certificate. In this situation, you need to have completed specific training and previous experience alone is not enough.

However, if you have already completed training which included food safety subjects, for example, a hospitality qualification, may already have completed the training needed to be a Food Safety Supervisor. If this is the case, before beginning any further training, first check any previous qualifications for the specific units of competency you require. Bear in mind though that some units of competency might be superseded or even expired. To check out the current units of competency for each food sector, you can visit the Food Industry Sectors in Australia.

Similarly, Registered Training Organisations engage in recognition of prior learning. This is a process that examines any previous informal or formal education relevant to food safety and hygiene. This assessment can determine whether a person already meets the correct competencies to be a Food Safety Supervisor.


Food Safety Supervisors have many responsibilities when performing their role and maintaining food safety in a business.

The key responsibilities of a Food Safety Supervisor are:

  • Ensuring that the business complies with all relevant food safety standards and codes.
  • Keeping the food safety program up-to-date and ensuring all staff know how and when to manage records.
  • Performing checks on the business for any breaches of food safety.
  • Identifying any potential food safety hazards and putting control measures in place to prevent them.
  • Ensuring all staff receive the proper training on the correct food safety practices.
  • Monitoring all employees in the workplace are and ensuring that they maintain a high standard of personal hygiene.
  • Handling any issues of noncompliance when they arise.
  • Acting as a point of contact for all Food Handlers in the business, as well as food safety authorities.

Whether a business needs to employ a Food Safety Supervisor will depend on where the business operates as well as what types of food it prepares.

Food businesses in Queensland, New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and Victoria are typically required to nominate at least one Food Safety Supervisor.

If your food business is located in one of the other states or territories in Australia, you still have an obligation to make sure that all Food Handlers in your business are appropriately trained in food safety. This is why, even though it’s not a legal requirement, we still recommend that your business has a Food Safety Supervisor.

You can contact your local council for more information about whether your business needs a Food Safety Supervisor. Because it will most likely be responsible for the day-to-day food safety regulation of your business, it’s your local council that’ll decide on the specific requirements for your business.


Becoming a Food Safety Supervisor is quite straightforward. You simply need to enrol in and complete a short course.

Many people choose to complete this training online because it’s more convenient than having to take time out from work to attend classroom training.

The Australian Institute of Food Safety offers a nationally recognised Food Safety Supervisor course that covers all industries. This course can be done in as little as a day and meets all legislative requirements for each of the states and territories.

Once you’ve completed the training, you can nominate yourself as the Food Safety Supervisor for your business and let your local food authority know.

For more information and some guidance on other factors to consider, check out 7 Steps to Becoming a Food Safety Supervisor


If you haven’t already done so, you need to notify the local council that you’re the nominated Food Safety Supervisor for the business where you work. This might be something that you do, or it might be done by your employer.

Or, if you’re starting a new food business, you’ll need to show the local council evidence that you’ve completed the course in order to apply for your food business licence, such as your Food Safety Supervisor Statement of Attainment.

Once you’ve done that, the next step is to create or review the business’s Food Safety Program and to start implementing food safety controls and procedures in the business.

At the Australian Institute of Food Safety, we’ve put together a number of handy guides to help you get started in your new role:

Food Safety Supervisor Guide to Building a Food Safety Program

Food Safety Supervisor Guide to Managing Allergy Risks in Customers

Food Safety Supervisor Guide to Managing a Product Recall

Food Safety Supervisor Guide to Food Poisoning

Food Safety Supervisor Guide to Handling Customer Complaints


Every food organisation in NSW has a responsibility to make sure its staff are properly trained in food safety.

To meet this requirement and to make sure that all food safety tasks are properly carried out, most food businesses will need to nominate at least one staff member to perform the role of Food Safety Supervisor.

The NSW Food Authority is the state’s regulatory body when it comes to food safety. The Authority established a Food Safety Supervisor Program to help reduce the number of foodborne illnesses occurring in the state’s hospitality and retail foodservice sectors. One way this program aims to achieve this is by improving the skills and knowledge of all food handlers.

In NSW, the food safety legislation is a little different to the other states and territories. For a Food Safety Supervisor to be qualified to work in NSW, the Food Authority requires not only a Statement of Attainment which shows that the required units of competency have been completed but also an authorised NSW Food Safety Supervisor certificate.

This additional certificate must have been issued by an approved training provider and needs to be redone every five years. You can renew your Food Safety Supervisor training through our NSW Recertification course

Another role of the Food Safety Supervisor Program is to provide food businesses with the necessary resources to be able to engage in high quality and consistent training undertaken through approved Registered Training Organisations (RTOs). This means that only Registered Training Organisations on the approved training provider list are authorised to issue the NSW Food Safety Supervisor Certificates - such as the Australian Institute of Food Safety.

For Business


This will depend on where your business is located and what type of food it serves.

Certain Australian states and territories require all registered food businesses to nominate a qualified Food Safety Supervisor. This person will normally need to have done a Food Safety Supervisor course to show that they can lead and manage a business’s Food Safety Program.

Usually, licensable food businesses must have a Food Safety Supervisor if they serve:

  • Ready-to-eat food,
  • Potentially hazardous food, or
  • Food not sold and served in its original package.

As a general rule, if you’re in a state or territory with this legislation, and your food business needs a licence, it will need a Food Safety Supervisor.

Guidelines for your State or Territory

To make it a little easier, here’s a brief guide outlining which states and territories legally require most food businesses to nominate a Food Safety Supervisor, and which do not.

Appointing a Food Safety Supervisor is mandatory in:

  • New South Wales
  • Queensland
  • Victoria
  • Australian Capital Territory

If your food business is registered in one of the above states, you may also be legally required to notify your local government with the details of your nominated Food Safety Supervisor.

A Food Safety Supervisor is highly recommended, but not mandatory, in:

  • Western Australia
  • Tasmania
  • South Australia
  • Northern Territory

Even though these locations don’t need a Food Safety Supervisor by law, training an employee as a Food Safety Supervisor is one of the best investments you can make for the future of your food business. Having someone who can design and oversee a Food Safety Program that protects your customers, improves efficiency, and reduces waste can be a huge advantage for any food business looking to deliver a premium product or service.

Who to contact for more information

Your local council can provide more guidance on the licensing and Food Safety Supervisor requirements for your state.

Once you’re certain that your state or territory requires you to employ a Food Safety Supervisor, you’ll then need to find out which units of competency you'll need to complete. 


The penalties for not having a Food Safety Supervisor are set at a state and territory level. The fine ranges from $330 to $75,000, depending on the situation and where the business is located.

Food safety is highly regulated in Australia and authorities can issue fines for many different reasons. Other penalties could be a suspension of the food business licence, closing down a business and even prosecution of the food business licensee.

To learn more about the penalties that could be applied to your food business, or for an overview of the state and territory penalties, please visit Penalty Charges for Not Having a Food Safety Supervisor


Once you’ve nominated a Food Safety Supervisor for your business, you would usually advise your local council in writing - either via email or through the post.

If you are applying for a business license, you might have to supply a copy of your Food Safety Supervisor’s Statement of Attainment, and NSW certificate if applicable, as proof.


Food Safety is everyone’s responsibility. The business owner, the Food Safety Supervisor and all the Food Handlers in an organisation play a part. Each has their own roles and responsibilities with regards to food safety.

Food Safety is monitored by all three levels of government. Legislation and regulations exist at a federal, state and local council level. If you have an Environmental Health Officer (EHO) visit your business, even though they probably work for your local council, they need to enforce legislation from all levels of government.

To learn more about the specific food safety roles and responsibilities for workers within your food business, you can check out this article.


Choosing the right person to perform the role of Food Safety Supervisor in your business is crucial. This person will be in charge of making sure that your business remains food safe, so it has to be someone responsible.

If you’re a food business owner, you should nominate someone trustworthy – yourself, your licensee, a manager, an employee, or an external contractor – who can fulfil the legal requirements set out in the Food Act.

This means choosing a person who:

  • Can demonstrate ‘reasonable availability’ at all times to ensure accountability and to protect your business
  • Understands the role and responsibilities of a Food Safety Supervisor
  • Has the authority to supervise staff in food handling
  • Has the organisational skills to implement a food safety program
  • Can complete Food Safety Supervisor training relevant to your food industry

For more information, check out our handy guide on how to choose the right Food Safety Supervisor for your team.


As a general rule, most food businesses in Victoria, Queensland, NSW and the ACT will require at least one designated Food Safety Supervisor per location.

Before opening, a food business needs to notify their local council’s health unit of their intended food handling activities. The local council will then judge the food safety requirements of the food business to determine what its food safety requirements are.

When making this decision, councils take many different things into account – including the types of high-risk food being produced by the business, its location and the chance of any food poisoning occurring.

But, it’s important to keep in mind that while some businesses can simply call their local council for this information, you might have to first fill in a food business application to find out.

Local councils can also tell the food business which food sector or industry it falls under so that the right Food Safety Supervisor training can be completed.

To find out exactly what your business’s food safety requirements are, you can contact your local council or state food authority.

For Students


Don’t worry - you can request a new one. If you’ve forgotten your password, simply click on the ‘login’ button at the top right of the screen.

Enter your User ID and then click on the ‘Forgotten password?’ link. You will receive an email inviting you to reset your password.

Forgotten your User ID? No problem. Check the emails we sent you when you first enrolled. If you still can’t find it, click on contact us and send us a message telling us your full name and the course that you are enrolled on. We’ll be happy to help! 


The Australian Institute of Food Safety has a specific course for students who want to do a Food Safety Supervisor course which covers them in NSW. This is because the NSW Food Authority has some extra regulations that we have to adhere to.

As well as a nationally recognised statement of attainment, students that complete this course are issued with a green NSW Food Authority Food Safety Supervisor Certificate. We need to issue this certificate using the stationery they provide, and we must be a registered RTO listed on the NSW Food Authority’s pre-approved trainers providers list. The fee that we get charged to do this, accounts for the difference in cost between the NSW and non-NSW Food Safety Supervisor course.

If you intend to work as a Food Safety Supervisor in New South Wales, it’s important that you enrol in this version of the course. You also need to keep in mind that the NSW Food Safety Supervisor certificate is only valid for 5 years from the date of issue. You can renew your Food Safety Supervisor training through our NSW Recertification course


For nationally recognised courses such as the Food Safety Supervisor course or the Food Handler course, the Australian Government requires that every student have a special identifying number unique to them. This is called a Unique Student Identifier number or USI.

Your USI number is quite easy to get and can be obtained in around 5 - 10 minutes.

General Food Safety


Unfortunately, the Australian Institute of Food Safety doesn’t currently offer any services to help businesses build their food safety program. But we do offer our students a free template to help get them started.

When building your food safety program, you need to learn about and understand the 7 principles of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP). There are a number of ways you can do this. One is to take a HACCP specific course such as the one offered by HACCPSAFE. Another option is to complete our Food Safety Supervisor course, which covers the HACCP system in detail.

Once you have the knowledge, you’ll be able to start building your food safety program. To give you some idea about how to do this and to explain what the environmental health officers will be looking for when they review your plan, we’ve put together a Food Safety Supervisor Guide to Building a Food Safety Program

If you’re after more information on how to build a food safety program for your business, then it’s a good idea to check out your local food authority’s website. Many of these websites have sample food safety programs and templates for businesses to download. And because they’re involved in regulating food safety in your business, they’re often the best people to talk to!


Food poisoning affects millions of Australians every year and can be hard to diagnose because it has similar symptoms to the flu and stomach viruses. Also because food poisoning can occur hours, days or even weeks later, determining the actual cause of the illness is not always easy. You might have eaten something that looked, smelled and tasted fine but was actually contaminated with harmful bacteria.

If you think you could be suffering from any type of food poisoning, then you’re encouraged to visit a medical professional.

For heaps of useful information on food poisoning, including tips on how to lower the risk of getting it, check out our handy survival guide


Whether you need a Food Safety Supervisor in your home-based food business will depend on where your business is located and what types of food you’re preparing and selling.

If you need to register or licence your home-based food business with your council, then they will be able to tell you if you’re required to nominate a Food Safety Supervisor.

Even if you’re preparing food from home, you’ll still have to show your local food authority that your premises meet all of its regulations for food handling. This could mean holding a certain licence, employing a Food Safety Supervisor and/or building a food safety program. This is the same for sole traders.

Many licensable food businesses in Australia must have a Food Safety Supervisor if they serve:

  • Ready-to-eat food,
  • Potentially hazardous food, or
  • Food not sold and served in its package.

The general rule is that if you are in a state or territory with this legislation, and your food business requires a licence, it requires a Food Safety Supervisor.

Appointing a Food Safety Supervisor is mandatory in:

  • New South Wales
  • Queensland
  • Victoria
  • Australian Capital Territory

If your food business is registered in one of the above states, you will most likely be legally required to notify your local government with the details of your nominated Food Safety Supervisor.

A Food Safety Supervisor is highly recommended, but not mandatory, in:

  • Western Australia
  • Tasmania
  • South Australia
  • Northern Territory

For more information on the food safety requirements for your state or territory, you can visit our dedicated pages.

  • Food Safety Regulations in Queensland
  • Food Safety Regulations in New South Wales
  • Food Safety Regulations in Victoria
  • Food Safety Regulations in the ACT

There are three different types of food contamination - chemical, physical and biological.

All foods are at risk of becoming contaminated, which increases the chance of the food making someone sick. It’s important to know how food can become contaminated so that you can protect against it.

Chemical contamination refers to food that has been contaminated by some type of chemical substance. Because chemicals can be very useful when cleaning in the kitchen, they can easily contaminate food. Chemicals must be properly labelled and stored separately for foodstuff to minimise the risk of contamination.

There are also chemicals that occur naturally in foods, like toxins in some fish, and in some cases, minimal chemical contamination might not actually lead to illness. However, the food handler must always be aware of the presence of chemicals in food and take all reasonable precautions to make sure that chemical contamination doesn’t happen.

Biological contamination refers to food that’s contaminated by substances produced by living creatures – such as humans, rodents, pests or microorganisms. This includes bacterial contamination, viral contamination or parasite contamination that’s transferred through saliva, pest droppings, blood or faecal matter. Bacterial contamination is thought to be the most common cause of food poisoning worldwide, and the best way to protect against it occurring is by maintaining the best food safety practices.

Physical contamination refers to food that has been contaminated by a foreign object at some stage of the production process. These objects have the ability to injure someone and can also potentially carry harmful biological contaminants, which then cause illness. An additional consequence of physical contamination is the upset caused to the person who finds the object. Things like band-aids, fingernails and pieces of cooking equipment are the last thing you would like to find in your meal.


Queensland food businesses fall under one of the five different food industry sectors - retail, hospitality, health and community, food processing or transport and distribution.

Below is a list of the Queensland food sectors, including their units of competency:

Retail: SIRRFSA001 Apply Retail Food Safety Practices

Hospitality: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

Health and community: HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practice & HLTFSE007 Oversee the day-to-day implementation of food safety in the workplace & HLTFSE005 Apply and monitor food safety requirements

Food processing: FBPFSY1001 Follow work procedures to maintain food safety & FDFFS2001AImplement the food safety program and procedures

Transport and distribution: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

Before beginning any Food Safety Supervisor training, it’s a good idea to contact your local council or state government to find out which units of competency you need to complete, in order to be qualified to work as a Food Safety Supervisor. 


Food businesses in the ACT will fall into one of five food industry sectors – retail, hospitality, health and community services, food processing, or transport and distribution.

The units of competency for each are outlined below, as well as some examples of the types of food businesses which fall into each food sector:

Retail: SIRRFSA001 Apply Retail Food Safety Practices

The retail food sector includes food businesses that prepare and sell food via retail - for example, convenience stores and service stations, supermarkets, delicatessens, retail markets and stalls, greengrocers and take-away stores.

Hospitality: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

The hospitality food sector includes hospitality businesses that prepare and sell food in the same location - for example, restaurants, cafés, hotels, caterers, bars and pubs.

Health and community services: HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practice & HLTFSE007 Oversee the day-to-day implementation of food safety in the workplace & HLTFSE005 Apply and monitor food safety requirements

The health and community services food sector refers to food businesses which handle, prepare or sell food to vulnerable people - for example, food prepared for hospitals, nursing homes, hostels, meals on wheels and childcare centres.

Food processing: FBPFSY1001 Follow work procedures to maintain food safety & FDFFS2001AImplement the food safety program and procedures

The food processing food sector includes food businesses that manufacture food - for example, wholesale bakeries, airline caterers, breweries, flour mills, pre‐prepared meals and wineries.

Transport and distribution: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

The transport and distribution food sector includes food businesses that do not actually prepare food but instead handle, store or transport food - for example, food distributors, water carriers and warehouses.


Food businesses in Victoria are divided into different food industry sectors - retail, hospitality, health and community, food processing, and transport and distribution. 

The units of competency for each are outlined below, as well as some examples of the types of food businesses which fall into each food sector:

Retail: SIRRFSA001 Apply Retail Food Safety Practices

The retail food sector includes food businesses that prepare and sell food via retail - for example, convenience stores and service stations, supermarkets, delicatessens, retail markets and stalls, greengrocers and take-away stores.

Hospitality: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

The hospitality food sector includes hospitality businesses that prepare and sell food in the same location - for example, restaurants, cafés, hotels, caterers, bars and pubs.

Health and community services: HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practice & HLTFSE007 Oversee the day-to-day implementation of food safety in the workplace & HLTFSE005 Apply and monitor food safety requirements

The health and community services food sector refers to food businesses which handle, prepare or sell food to vulnerable people - for example, food prepared for hospitals, nursing homes, hostels, meals on wheels and childcare centres.

Food processing: FDFFS1001A Follow work procedures to maintain food safety & FDFFS2001A Implement the food safety program and procedures

The food processing food sector includes food businesses that manufacture food - for example, wholesale bakeries, airline caterers, breweries, flour mills, pre‐prepared meals and wineries.

Transport and distribution: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

The transport and distribution food sector includes food businesses that do not actually prepare food but instead handle, store or transport food - for example, food distributors, water carriers and warehouses.


Knowing which industry your food business falls under, and subsequently which training course you need to complete, can be hard. The reason you have to choose an industry is that the statement of attainment you’re awarded for Food Safety Supervisor training is industry specific.

Food businesses have different training requirements because they’re all so different. Each business is categorised into an industry, also known as a food sector, depending on what type of business it is, what type of food it handles and where it’s located. The different industries have different training requirements, and if you want to work as the Food Safety Supervisor, you have to complete the units of competency suitable for your industry.

Towards the end of your course, you may be asked to select a food industry. The industries that you can choose from are:

  • Hospitality
  • Retail
  • Health & community
  • Food processing
  • Transport & distribution

Please note: If you’re in NSW, only the retail and hospitality industries are recognised by the NSW Food Authority.

If you are participating in the Advanced Food Safety course or the Food Handler course you don’t need to select your industry.

To learn more about each industry, and the associated units of competency, you can visit this article.


There are only two food sectors, also known as food industries, recognised in NSW - hospitality and retail.

The NSW Food Authority generally doesn’t differentiate between the two, which means that you can complete either; the two hospitality units of competency; or the one retail unit of competency, to be considered a Food Safety Supervisor. We have listed the units below:

RETAIL: SIRRFSA001 Apply Retail Food Safety Practices

HOSPITALITY: SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety & SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices

Also, it’s important to note that the NSW Food Authority will only recognise training if it’s delivered by a registered training organisation (RTO) that has been approved by the Authority - such as the Australian Institute of Food Safety.

Handbook & Policies


The participant information handbook is designed to provide you with all of the information you need to make an informed choice, and as a reference guide throughout your training and assessment. 

You can download the participant information handbook here!

If you need any further information or have any questions about the content of this handbook, please send us an email via our contact us page or call 1300 797 020. 


Below is the Australian Institute of Food Safety’s payment policy.

  • Full payment is required at the time of purchase unless your organisation has been approved for credit by the Australian Institute of Food Safety.
  • For online payments, we accept Visa, Mastercard, Amex and PayPal.
  • To request other forms of payment, please contact us
  • If you are an organisation who will be enrolling students on a regular basis and would like to apply for a credit account, please go to the business section of this website. 

Below is the Australian Institute of Food Safety’s pricing policy.

  • The latest prices of all products and services offered by the Australian Institute of Food Safety are available on the website (www.foodsafety.com.au).
  • These prices are subject to change without notice. Please confirm the price of a product or service before placing an order. All prices are quoted in Australian Dollars (AUD).
  • Nationally recognised courses in Australia are GST exclusive, and so GST is not included in our tax invoices for these products.
  • Non-nationally recognised courses are subject to GST and this is included in the price advertised online.
  • All payments should be made to the Australian Institute of Food Safety and should be paid in AUD.

The Australian Institute of Food Safety is committed to respecting the privacy of its customers. The following policy discusses how personal information received by The Australian Institute of Food Safety will be dealt with.

To view the Privacy Policy for the Australian Institute of Food Safety visit Privacy Policy


This procedure is designed to establish a fair and equitable company process for dealing with client/participant complaints and appeals.

Complaints & appeals procedure

  • Discuss the complaint or appeal with the Trainer or Assessor, or Management
  • If the complaint or appeal is not addressed to the satisfaction of the participant/client, the client or participant is advised to complete a Complaints and Appeals Statement (request via Contact Us page) and forward to Management
  • Management will evaluate the complaint or appeal, conduct an enquiry where necessary and address the complaint or appeal, responding initially within 5 working days. The client or participant will be offered an opportunity to present his or her case and may wish to ask a support person to attend
  • If the complaint or appeal is not addressed to the satisfaction of the participant, Management can make further enquiries if necessary, document actions or solutions to the complaint or appeal and advise the person submitting the complaint or appeal of the outcome within 10 working days
  • If the complaint remains unresolved the person submitting the complaint or appeal will be referred to external avenues

The Australian Institute of Food Safety will safeguard fees paid by participants/trainees.

Participants will be eligible for a refund of 100% of any monies paid if the following conditions have been satisfied:

  • The request for refund has been received in writing within 7 days of enrolment, AND
  • The participant has not yet accessed the course.

At AIFS, we take all reasonable steps to preserve the security of cookie and personal information. This Security Policy provides further details. 

To view the Security Policy for the Australian Institute of Food Safety visit Security Policy.


To comply with the Australian Quality Training Framework, all Registered Training Organisations have an obligation to provide information to participants about the various laws and regulations applicable to them.

The Australian Institute of Food Safety ensures that its training is in compliance with relevant State/Territory and Commonwealth legislation in the following areas:

  • Workplace Health and Safety
  • Workplace Harassment, victimisation and bullying
  • Anti-discrimination, including equal opportunity, racial vilification, and disability discrimination
  • Privacy Legislation

The list below outlines some of the individual pieces of legislation (law) that apply in a general work environment including training.

Information regarding all Commonwealth legislation can be accessed via the Australasian Legal Information Institute. Some of the general Commonwealth acts applicable include:

  • Disability Discrimination Act 1992
  • Sex Discrimination Act 1984
  • Racial Discrimination Act 1975
  • Copyright Act 1968
  • Occupational Health and Safety (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991

State-specific information regarding occupational health and safety can be located through the Australasian Legal Information Institute.  For each state and territory, the legislation is:

  • NSW: Occupational Health and Safety Act 2000
  • WA: Occupational Health and Safety Act 1984
  • ACT: Occupational Health and Safety Act 1989
  • VIC: Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004
  • SA: Occupational Health and Safety and Welfare Act 1986
  • TAS: Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995
  • NT: Work Health Act
  • QLD: Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995

In Queensland, the following general legislation applies and can be accessed via the website at www.legislation.qld.gov.au

  • Training and Employment Act 2000 (including info for apprenticeships & traineeships)
  • Anti-discrimination Act 1991

The AIFS Terms of Use govern your use of the website and other AIFS systems. By accessing these systems, you are signifying that you agree to the terms.

To view the complete Terms of User for the Australian Institute of Food Safety visit Terms of Use.

Payment Information


The Australian Institute of Food Safety accepts payment via Visa, MasterCard, American Express or PayPal for our online courses. Payment is required at the time of purchase.

For our business account users, a 30-day invoicing solution is available – see our Business page for more details. 

To learn more about our payment, refund and other policies, please click here


You can find out the cost for each of our online courses by going to the individual course pages on our website.

The course fee covers everything that you will need for the course – there are no ‘hidden charges’ for anything like telephone support, resetting quiz attempts or printing your statement of attainment.

If you would like to apply for recognition of prior learning (RPL) or national recognition/recognition of current competency (RCC), then there may be some fees associated with this.

Please contact our friendly support team for more information about this, or if you would like to inquire about on-site training. 

Qualifications


The Australian Institute of Food Safety can only replace statements of attainment that it originally issued.

If you need a replacement, please contact us with your name, date of birth, address and reason for replacement and we can organise to have one sent to you.

Please note, there is a small charge associated with re-issuing a statement of attainment.

If you lose your NSW Food Safety Supervisor Certificate, you can contact the NSW Food Authority and request another one.


Statements of attainment are documents (like a certificate) that show the units of competency that a student completes as part of a nationally recognised course. Unfortunately, we can’t call them certificates because ‘certificates’ are a different type of qualification in vocational training. Sorry, we know this is a little confusing!

Your statement of attainment will be professionally printed and sent to you in a graduation pack, along with a printed display certificate that lists the name of the course you completed. For those students who complete the NSW Food Safety Supervisor course, you will also receive the NSW Food Authority Food Safety Supervisor certificate.

You may wish to use the units of competency attained through this training towards a further qualification such as a qualification in Hospitality. Please feel free to contact us if you would like details of how you can further your training in this way.


Each state in Australia has different requirements for food safety refresher training.

The statement of attainment that you receive from the Australian Institute of Food Safety doesn’t have an expiry date. However, a Food Safety Supervisor certificate issued by the NSW Food Authority does need to be redone every five years.

In the ACT, the current legislation states that you also need to refresh your Food Safety Supervisor training every 5 years.

We recommend you keep an eye out for any legislative changes that might affect you or your business, including new units of competency being released. This is because it’s your responsibility to check the legislation for your state to find out if, and when, you need to refresh your food safety training.

Here are some useful links that may help you to find this information:

Department of Health – Food Safety (ACT) – health.act.gov.au

Food Authority (NSW) – www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au

Department of Health – Food Safety (NT) – www.health.nt.gov.au

Department of Health – Food Safety (QLD) – www.health.qld.gov.au

Department of Health – Food Safety (SA) – www.sahealth.sa.gov.au

Department of Health & Human Services – Food Safety (TAS) – www.dhhs.tas.gov.au

Department of Health – Food Safety (VIC) – www.health.vic.gov.au

Department of Health – Food Safety (WA) – www.public.health.wa.gov.au

Student Accounts


Changing your password is easy. Simply login and go to ‘my account’. In the ‘account information’ section you will find a link to change your password.

If you’ve forgotten your password don’t worry, you can request an email with a new password here.

Problems? Go to the contact us page for details on how to get in touch.


You will need to provide your personal details such as name, contact telephone number, email address, postal address as well as a few other basic pieces of information. This allows us to create a user account which you will use to complete your course.

For nationally recognised courses such as the Food Safety Supervisor course or the Food Handler course, you will also be required to have a government-issued Unique Student Identifier number or USI.

Your USI number is quite easy to get and can be obtained in around 5 - 10 minutes, however, you will need a piece of identification such as a drivers licence, passport, Medicare card or ImmiCard.

System Requirements


Yes, you can. AIFS courses work on most computers, laptops, tablets and mobile devices.

If you’re using your mobile device and having technical issues, there could be an issue with your browser. We recommend that you use Google Chrome to access your course, which is available to download for free from your app store.

If you’re having problems accessing your course or any other technical issues, please visit our What should I do if I have technical issues? or contact our support team for help.


To complete one of the Australian Institute of Food Safety’s online courses, you’ll need to make sure that you have the following:

1. A modern web browser

We use some of the latest eLearning technologies to deliver our courses. This means you’ll need to have a modern web browser to view and complete the course, and it’s important that you have Javascript enabled. We recommend using Google Chrome, which is available as a free download online or from your app store.

2. An email address

When you first enrol in a course or create a user account, we’ll ask you for your email address. This is a mandatory requirement for you to be able to access our systems and each user account needs to have an individual email address. One email address cannot be shared by multiple students.

3. Adobe PDF Reader or Adobe Acrobat

Some of the forms that you need to complete (such as the Observer Report) are in PDF format. To get the latest version of Adobe PDF Reader, you can visit their website.

AIFS courses work on most computers, laptops, tablets and mobile devices.

If you’re having problems accessing your course or any other technical issues, please visit our What should I do if I have technical issues? FAQ or contact our support team for help. 


We have tried to make our website and courses as easy to follow as possible. But we do know that, from time to time, our students might experience technical issues. So to make things a little easier, we’ve put together this list of how to fix the most common technical issues.

You aren’t able to login to your account

If you’re having trouble logging in to your account, first double check that you’re using the correct User ID. This was sent to you in your welcome email and is three lowercase letters, followed by seven numbers - eg. abc1234567. The password that you use to login is the one you set when you created your user account, this was also included in your welcome email.

If you’re still not able to login with these details, you can clear your browser’s website data (your cache) and then try again. There are different ways to do this depending on your device and browser, so you might have to search online for the steps.

You’re logged in but can’t find your course

When you first login to your account, you’re taken to your ‘Dashboard’. This is like your own individual homepage. On the lefthand side, there is an option called ‘My Courses’, which takes you to a page that lists the courses that you’re enrolled in. Once you’re on this page, you can click the ‘Enter Course’ button to go to your course page and get started.

You’re having trouble loading the video lessons

AIFS courses work on most computers, laptops, tablets and mobile devices.

If you’re having trouble watching the videos, we have found that using Google Chrome will usually fix the issue. This web browser is available as a free download either online or from your app store.

If you have a technical issue and can’t find the answer here in the FAQs, please contact our support team and they’ll be happy to help you!