Woolworths Changes In-Store Bread Recipes to Remove Additives

These days it seems as if people are more health conscious than ever before when it comes to the food they put into their bodies.
November 22, 2012

These days it seems as if people are more health conscious than ever before when it comes to the food they put into their bodies.

Common food additives like preservatives, bleaching agents, emulsifiers, and other similar chemicals are on the chopping block with more and more food manufacturers and grocery store brands removing them from recipes as a result.

Supermarket giant Woolworth’s is among the latest to join the ranks of such brands. They’ve recently announced major changes to the recipes of their in-house bakery items and breads that will eliminate several major food additives from the mix.

These changes are part of a campaign to give Woolworth’s shoppers more of what they want and that includes preservative-free baked goods that are more wholesome and natural over all. The additives in question include vegetable emulsifiers 481, 472, and 471, as well as antioxidant 306 and acidity regulator 297. The changes in question will affect the bakery sections of over 560 different Woolworth’s stores.

“Our customers have provided very clear feedback that they are concerned about additives in their food, so we have made our in-store baked bread free from these artificial additives,” says Woolworth’s Bakery Head, Alex Holt in a recent interview.

The recent push to make in-store bakery goods more desirable and appealing to today’s modern consumers is also thought to be connected to concerns that the bread sectors of many stores are suffering thanks to many modern economic changes. Jobs are being slashed left and right. Drought problems have also contributed to recent issues with crop yield. The result is an ailing industry that has become a risky investment for many business owners.

Woolworth’s hopes that by giving more consumers what they want for the good of themselves and their families, they’ll be doing their part to increase in-store bread sales and help the Australian baking community get back on its feet.