Being Safe When Purchasing Eggs and Dairy Products

When it comes to handling and purchasing groceries, many people know the basic ins and outs of how to make smart decisions
December 15, 2012

When it comes to handling and purchasing groceries, many people know the basic ins and outs of how to make smart decisions. 
However, some types of food still present a bit of a challenge when it comes to safe handling practices.

Eggs and dairy products are definitely among these types, as both kinds of food are known to be touchy as far as safety issues are concerned. Here’s how to make sure that you’re an ace at selecting your products and preserving their integrity for the sake of both you and your family.

Buying and Storing Dairy

The pattern you use to navigate the grocery store when it comes to choosing your items matters. Perishable, fragile items like milk should be selected among the last of your items in order to ensure that they stay as cold as possible until you can get them home and into your fridge.

Opt for milk or cream that comes in a cardboard container capable of keeping light out, as light can cause milk to spoil faster. Never store your milk and dairy products on the door of the fridge, as that section doesn’t become or stay as cold. Once the milk is opened, it’s good for one week, so consume or throw out by then.

Buying and Storing Eggs

When choosing eggs, be sure to select a container that actually feels cold to the touch. As with your milk, choose a spot in your fridge that you can be sure will keep your eggs as cold as they need to be to stay fresh.

Raw eggs can be kept for a maximum of 3 weeks in your refrigerator, so be sure that you’ve eaten yours or thrown them out before that amount of time has passed. Eggs that have been hard-boiled will last about a week. Never, ever eat raw eggs under any circumstances.